KEEP COUNT OF YOUR MACRONUTRIENTS

When come to nutrition and weight loss Keeping count of the ratio of macro nutrients which are your fats, proteins and carbohydrates that you consume is key to get lean.

Fats

Dietary fat refers to the fats and oils found naturally in animal and plant foods, and those used in cooking, at the table, and added to processed foods. Dietary fat is made up of fatty acids. There are two types of fatty acids: saturated and unsaturated.

They’re used by the body as energy for production of hormones and as protection for our organs.

Benefits of dietary fats:

You don’t need to eliminate all fat from your diet. In fact, some fats actually help promote good health. But it’s wise to choose the healthier types of dietary fat and then enjoy them as part of a balanced diet.

There are numerous types of fat. Your body makes its own fat from taking in excess calories. Some fats are found in the foods you eat — these are called dietary fats. Dietary fat is a macronutrient that provides energy for your body.

Fat is essential to your health because it supports a number of your body’s functions. Some vitamins, for instance, must have fat to dissolve so that they can be used by your body.

Types of fats:

  • Unhealthy fats

There are two main types of potentially harmful dietary fats:

Saturated fat: This type of fat comes mainly from animal sources of food, such as red meat, poultry and full-fat dairy products. Saturated fats raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol levels, which may increase your risk of cardiovascular disease.

Trans fat: This type of fat occurs naturally in some foods in small amounts. But most trans fats are made from oils through a food processing method called partial hydrogenation. These partially hydrogenated trans fats can increase total blood cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, but lower HDL cholesterol. This can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease.

  • Healthier fat:

The potentially helpful types of dietary fat are primarily unsaturated fats:

Monounsaturated fatty acids: This type of fat is found in a variety of foods and oils. Studies show that eating foods rich in monounsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fats improves blood cholesterol levels, which can decrease your risk of heart disease and may also help decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Polyunsaturated fatty acids: This type of fat is found mostly in plant-based foods and oils. Evidence shows that eating foods rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fats improves blood cholesterol levels, which can decrease your risk of heart disease and may also help decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Omega-3 fatty acids: One type of polyunsaturated fat is made up of mainly omega-3 fatty acids and may be especially beneficial for heart health. Omega-3, found in some types of fatty fish, appears to decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. There are plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids. However, it hasn’t yet been determined whether replacements for fish oil — plant-based or krill — have the same health effects as omega-3 fatty acid from fish.

Proteins

Proteins are made up of amino acids. Think of them as building blocks that can be broken down and re-assembled in different ways.

Protein and amino acids are the main components of our muscles, bones, skin, tissues, and organs. When we eat protein, our body breaks it down into individual amino acids during digestion and then uses these amino acids to create new proteins where needed.

If we don’t eat enough protein, our body will start to plunder it from within – beginning with the breakdown of muscle.

Source of proteins:

  • Meat and meat products (beef, chicken, lamb, pork)
  • Fish and seafood
  • Eggs
  • Dairy food such as milk and yoghurt (also carbohydrate)
  • Beans and pulses (also carbohydrates)
  • Nuts (also fats)
  • Cottage Cheese (Paneer)
  • Soy and tofu products

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates provide the body with glucose, which is converted to energy used to support bodily functions and physical activity

But carbohydrate quality and quantity are important; some types of carbohydrate-rich foods are better than others:

The healthiest sources of carbohydrates—unprocessed or minimally processed whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans—promote good health by delivering vitamins, minerals, fiber, and a host of important phytonutrients.

Unhealthier sources of carbohydrates include white bread, pastries, sodas, and other highly processed or refined foods.  These items contain easily digested carbohydrates that may contribute to weight gain, interfere with weight loss, and promote diabetes and heart disease.